Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Ten Things Tuesday- Regional Words and Phrases

All over the place people call the same thing by different names.
Things like the hash mark versus the pound key.

It can be both confusing and interesting.
You might get weird looks for saying what is normal
Or even just asking what the hell people are talking about.

This week's Ten Things Tuesday is about words or phrases that are different depending on where you are.

1. Pop
   In Iowa, pop is what is known as soda or soda pop in other parts of the US. Restaurant menus call it a soft drink though.

2. Coke
   Also known as pop, aka soda. I used to live in Arkansas and everything was Coke even if it was really a Dr. Pepper. I worked in a c-store and one day my boss told me to change the Coke prices. I asked him if I should change the Pepsi products too and I got the "you are a dumbass" look.

3. Supper
   The evening meal. Known to some as dinner.

4. Dinner
    The noon meal. Known to some as lunch.

5. The deer woods.
   In Arkansas, you don't just hunt in any woods for deer. They are in the deer woods. Never ask if other animals live there too. They don't find it funny.

6. Fixin'
 Being an Iowa girl, fixing means to fix something because it doesn't work or it broke. Down South it means going. "I'm fixin' to go to the deer woods. I need to buy a Coke first."

7. Coupons
   I have always called it coupons with a coo sound. Even though the majority of Iowans have always pronounced it like quepons. My mom thinks coopons sounds odd.

8. Squash
   Midwesterners don't have much of an accent. However most people, especially older generations, pronounce squash as squorsh. It's the same thing with the word wash. Drives me nuts.

9. Barbecue
   Grill out. Some people call it grilling out. Some people call it barbecuing. Around here it is known as grilling. Barbecue is a sauce. I love to grill!

10. Wetback
    In New Zealand, this is a slang term for a firefighter. I used to do a paid to post site and certain words were censored. The company is based in the US and wetback was not allowed. When a New Zealander started a discussion about wetbacks, it wouldn't let her write that. To bypass censors, she had to add a extra t. In the US, wetback is a derogatory term for an illegal alien, usually Mexican although it could be any Hispanic. The term came when many illegals started crossing the Rio Grande River  from Mexico into the US.


What words or phrases do you know that people say in one area of the world, but is different somewhere else?

18 comments:

  1. You worked in a "c-store"? Was your boss lady a real pain?

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    Replies
    1. Convenience store, you goof and the boss was a man. And what boss isn't a pain sometimes?

      Delete
  2. You mean some people cross the Rio Grande illegally? Are the authorities aware of this? Or Batman?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, that it's hard to believe. Nonetheless, it is true.
      I think the authorities may know. I have heard the words "putting alligators in the Rio Grande" bandied about.
      Maybe they are going to try that instead of the bat signal. See where it goes.

      Delete
  3. I loved this! Deer woods, huh?! I grew up in Southern California, so I knew what a wetback was - - and I never understood my mother who always used to say she was going to warsh the clothes. Hmmmm.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Judy. Saying words with an r sound when there is no r completely baffles me.

      Delete
  4. How are you?
    In England a vacume cleaner is called a Hoover.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, Munir. Long time no see.
      That makes some sense since that is a brand.
      I am well, hope you are too.

      Delete
  5. My parents always said, 'serviette' which is french for napkin. Most of Canada said that. Now we say napkin. A loonie is a one dollar coin, a toonie is a two dollar coin. They get very heavy in your purse. I've never heard the term 'Deer woods', I found that interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have heard of a loonie, but not of a toonie. I don't know many french words.

      Delete
    2. You hit 10 nails on the head. Along with that Midwestern squorsh goes worsh.

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    3. Thank you, Manzanita! I try my best.

      Delete
  6. Stopping by to welcome you on board the A to Z Challenge April 2012
    We shall have loads of fun exchanging comments and visits!

    Twitter: @AprilA2Z
    #atozchallenge

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for stopping by Damyanti.

      Delete
  7. I know this sounds ridiculous, but when I came to Cincinnati, everyone was talking about playing cornhole. Let me just say, where I come from, playing cornhole is most definitely not a good thing!

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, I am pretty sure it isn't what I think playing cornhole is either.

      Delete
  8. Hi, Ruth. Here in Baltimore, many do not use the word faucet. Instead, they refer to as a spigot, but pronounce it like this: Spicket. Ugh!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Queen Bee. I don't hear spigot too often. Spricket sounds odd.

      Delete

Thanks for commenting.